Best Databases of 2011

Library Journal polled a group of librarians and LJ reviewers to choose the “Best” Databases of 2011.  The one named “Best Overall” is CredoReference, which is available through the BSC Library.  Here’s what the evaluators had to say:

“Looking for material from the Library of Congress? Elsevier? Edinburgh University Press? Credo Reference hosts more than 550 reference titles from those and other respected houses. Jennifer Michaelson says it’s the best database she uses, with straightforward search and results pages. The database can be linked to the library’s OPAC and to other resources. Credo also offers several unusual features: a “Gadget” bar on the homepage, for example, with search boxes labeled “Define,” “Person,” “Images,” “Pronunciation,” “Crossword Solver,” and “Conversions” (e.g., temperature, area). Best of all, though, says Lura Sanborn, are the database’s “Topic Pages” gathering materials by subject, which adds accessibility options to a resource that was “awesome to begin with.” Christine Sharbrough nominated the collection for “Best Integration of Media” and “Best Integration of External Content.” “I love the way [Credo] allows us to pull together catalog entries, videos, journal articles, and images from the web for patrons,” she says. “That’s tremendously helpful in finding esoteric subject matter.” She also praises Credo’s Mind Map feature for narrowing and broadening topics, helping students to visualize their topic and identify keywords. The upcoming Credo ­literati is an information literacy add-on that includes subject-specific tutorials and videos, customization that reflects the language an institution uses for information literacy instruction, pre- and postassessment surveys, and library marketing programs.”

Check it out on our Databases -General Research page!

I’m pleased to say that we also subscribe to several others on the “Best” list, including American Song, NetLibrary (EBSCO ebook and eaudiobook collections), AccessScience, Films on Demand, Encyclopedia Briannica, Literary Reference Center, Auto Repair Reference Center, and Ancestry.com (Library edition).  Check them all out! (BSC Library Databases)

Note: If you are prompted for a library card number or library access number when accessing the databases, it is the 14-digit barcode on the back of your BSC photo ID.  Your password is your last name (no spaces; not case-sensitive).  To apply for an online library access number, go to our Online Services page.

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